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 Trichocereus scopulicola

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lewis
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PostSubject: Trichocereus scopulicola   Sun Jun 06, 2010 2:50 pm

Here is a local scop in Melbourne's suburbs
As you can see it loves the climate.. fattest one i've ever seen. cyclops


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Lachy
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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Sun Jun 06, 2010 4:59 pm

That's a real beauty. I really like the "chunkiness" of this particular species' growth habit.

I do like scops as landscaping plants; I think they're a good choice for gardeners who want to grow cacti but are put off by the spines. A kid- and pet-friendly cactus, perhaps?
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lewis
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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Sun Jun 06, 2010 9:59 pm

Quote :
I think they're a good choice for gardeners who want to grow cacti but are put off by the spines. A kid- and pet-friendly cactus, perhaps?

I think you are on to a winner there Lach. Very Happy


though i think bunnings are ahead of you though..
They are probs the commonest seen Tricho in Bunnings... at least here in Melbourne, although I'm inclined to believe that a lot of what they sell is actually scop x pachanoi.

they are not that common as garden plants just yet... pachanoi is commoner
and spachianus is commoner still
in terms of trichos
but Opuntia ficus-indica and Cereus peruvianus are winning in terms of general cacti.
at least in Vic.

Interestingly I heard and saw a pic years back of a successful cross between T. scop and Echinopsis subdenudata (semi-nudum or whatever its name is)... the common one that's almost spineless with the big white areoles and astro-like appearance with the white flower.... interesting to think that the trichos just a taller version of a globular echinopsis. Would have been easier if they were never differentiated at all and were all called Echinopsis from the start. Smile

Also I heard that this is now classed by some under Echinopsis lageniformis (new name for Trichocereus bridgesii). I guess if you imagine a normal bridgesii without spines they look pretty similar don't they. kinda like a spiness lageniformis cultivar.

Actually I've been pondering this for quite a while... is it possible that the ex. Trichocereus Echinopsis group; pachanoi/bridgesii/scopulicola/peruvianus and possibly more are all just different forms of the one extremely variable species? Question
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Lachy
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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Sun Jun 06, 2010 11:59 pm

Quote :
though i think bunnings are ahead of you though..
They are probs the commonest seen Tricho in Bunnings... at least here in Melbourne, although I'm inclined to believe that a lot of what they sell is actually scop x pachanoi.

I've got a few of the Bunnings plants... and I agree. I don't believe they are a pure species at all, and I strongly suspect they're pach x scop too. My samples are only seedlings so their morphology probably isn't a reliable indicator; however at this stage it seems that they tend towards 6- or 7-ribbed forms (all the scops I have seen are 5-ribbed), and the ribs are less pronounced thant the common PC pedro yet more defined than the structure seen in scops.

Quote :
Actually I've been pondering this for quite a while... is it possible that the ex. Trichocereus Echinopsis group; pachanoi/bridgesii/scopulicola/peruvianus and possibly more are all just different forms of the one extremely variable species?

The more I look at the whole Trichocereus genus, the more I tend to agree with you. The variation among the forms of pachanoi strongly suggests to me that the Trichs have some significant variation even at species level. The analogy that's been running through my mind is this: consider dog breeds. Compare a Chihuahua to a St Bernard to a Corgi... aside from basic skeletal structure these three animals have little in common with each other; yet they are all Canis familiaris. The differences - at least to my eye - are far slighter between Trichocereus.
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lewis
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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Tue Jun 08, 2010 3:03 pm

Yeah I'd be interested to see what these scop x pachs look like when they mature a bit, mine are still only very small seedlings also.

I quite like the dog breed analogy, which would make even more sense if at least some of these Trichocereus species are semi-domesticated in South America. Smile
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mutant
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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Wed Jun 09, 2010 5:01 pm

I too think you got lots of scop and scop-pach hybrids in ozland.

And yeah, the limits of said [+more] Trichocereus species delve in other species . These are most probably a couple of species that have hybridised between them a lot

The fact that you in Ozland got many scop-pach hybrids is probably from the fact you could not import easily anything from a point and on, so you hybridised what you had, while I am not so sure scopoculica and pachanoi areas intercross in the wild....

Beautiful plant btw....

Scops tend a lot to increase/decrease their width don't they?
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Darren
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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Wed Jun 09, 2010 7:56 pm

Quote :
A kid- and pet-friendly cactus, perhaps?

i need the biggest and baddest spines in my house to deter the kid & pet or at least leave a lasting impression so they wont go near them ever again
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pricklypear



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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Thu Mar 22, 2012 11:13 pm

lewis wrote:
Here is a local scop in Melbourne's suburbs
As you can see it loves the climate.. fattest one i've ever seen. cyclops
Does anyone know of a local mail order supplier for T.scopulicola seeds? While plants can be got from Collectors Corner, the seeds appear to be scarce. Which is strange considering the scop's unique appearance. Why seeds? - I find it's much more fun that way.

Thanks.
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pricklypear



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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Sun Mar 25, 2012 12:07 pm

Lachy wrote:
Quote :
though i think bunnings are ahead of you though..
They are probs the commonest seen Tricho in Bunnings... at least here in Melbourne, although I'm inclined to believe that a lot of what they sell is actually scop x pachanoi.

I've got a few of the Bunnings plants... and I agree. I don't believe they are a pure species at all, and I strongly suspect they're pach x scop too. My samples are only seedlings so their morphology probably isn't a reliable indicator; however at this stage it seems that they tend towards 6- or 7-ribbed forms (all the scops I have seen are 5-ribbed), and the ribs are less pronounced thant the common PC pedro yet more defined than the structure seen in scops.
It may be that Bunnings and other chain stores use different suppliers depending on the state. For example my local Bunnings get their cacti primarily from Collectors Corner and I've never seen any tricho species on offer there. I did however spot a Collectors Corner T.Scop at the local KMart and bought it. The dark skin color and texture is very different from other trichos and has the distinctive fat almost spineless ribs. When I got it it was starting to lose a rib - from 6 to 5.

Two summers later it's now at 21 cm. Thus far I've had it under cover. At what size would it be safe to put outside? Thanks.
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IXOXI
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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Wed Mar 28, 2012 10:16 pm

A good portion of each Bunnings inventory depends on the distributers, and the sales people that work the accounts at each store. 3 of the Bunnings in my area have (for the time being) dropped the cacti from Hamilton's and only have Collector's Corner ones now. That was the decision of the salesperson for this region, is what I was told.
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Lachy
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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Thu Mar 29, 2012 11:25 am

Quote :
Two summers later it's now at 21 cm. Thus far I've had it under cover. At what size would it be safe to put outside? Thanks.

I grow virtually all my plants outside, fully exposed to the elements, and I am yet to see any rotting or loss of trichocereus species.

The only things that you really have to watch out for is sunburn - really only an issue on plants during the height of summer, and even then only on plants that are not used to bright sun - and to ensure that your soil has adequate drainage. Scops seem to be the most tolerant of excess water, so I reckon you will be fine.
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IXOXI
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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Thu Mar 29, 2012 11:41 am

By the way, Collector's Corner has a bunch of T. scopulicola for sale on ebay right now for $6 each.
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pricklypear



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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Thu Mar 29, 2012 7:51 pm

Lachy wrote:
I grow virtually all my plants outside, fully exposed to the elements, and I am yet to see any rotting or loss of trichocereus species.

The only things that you really have to watch out for is sunburn - really only an issue on plants during the height of summer, and even then only on plants that are not used to bright sun - and to ensure that your soil has adequate drainage. Scops seem to be the most tolerant of excess water, so I reckon you will be fine.
Thanks for the advice. I'll place it where it's a little shaded and gets morning sun. Will probably wait until next spring - no point tempting the snails Smile
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pricklypear



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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Thu Mar 29, 2012 8:22 pm

IXOXI wrote:
By the way, Collector's Corner has a bunch of T. scopulicola for sale on ebay right now for $6 each.
Yes. It appears to be one of their regular lines on ebay. One assumes they're growing and selling a lot of them.

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IXOXI
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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Thu Mar 29, 2012 8:48 pm

I just bought a couple of them Smile
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pricklypear



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PostSubject: Re: Trichocereus scopulicola   Thu Mar 29, 2012 10:18 pm

IXOXI wrote:
I just bought a couple of them Smile
That's what I would do - given the postage cost for one Wink

I hope you like them. It's certainly one of my favourite trichs for looks and build.
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